Computer Headset – The Most Recently Released Buyer Ratings About Buying Computer Headset.

The subsequent great peripherals war is being waged over your ears. After every company on earth put out a gaming mouse and then a mechanical keyboard, now it’s time for headsets. So gaming headphone.

We understand you don’t want to scroll through every headset review when all you need is an easy answer: “What’s the best gaming headset I can buy with my hard-earned dollars?” This web site supports the answer you seek, whatever your financial allowance is.

We’ll keep updating our recommendations since we take a look at new services and find stronger contenders. For this latest update, we’ve reviewed a few fancypants models, namely the Sennheiser Game Zero and and Sennheiser GSP 350, and the Audio-Technica ATH-AG1X. To get more earthly budgets, we’ve also tested the SteelSeries Arctis 7, the HyperX Cloud Revolver S, and also the Logitech G533, which debuts as our new best mid-range wireless headset.

Kingston doesn’t have similar pedigree within the headset space as the competitors, although the HyperX Cloud is a winning device with a cheap price.

Our 2016 headset recommendation remains just about similar to our 2015 headset recommendation (and our 2014, in fact): The Kingston HyperX Cloud. Or, if you’re feeling somewhat fancier, the Cloud II. It’s comfortable, it appears great, and (on top of that) it’s comparatively cheap. What else could you possibly want in the headset?

True to the name, the HyperX Cloud is amongst the most comfortable headsets on the market. It’s hefty, by using a solid-metal construction that belies its cheap price, but sits feather-light around the head. The faux-leather earpieces are generously padded, oversized, and form an excellent seal without squeezing too much.

And yes it sounds excellent. As I said inside our review, this isn’t a studio-quality set of headphones. It’s got the typical gaming-centric bass boost plus a slick top end, but both are subtle enough that this HyperX Cloud competes favorably with laptop headphone twice its price. There’s no Kingston-provided way to adjust the sound, considering that the HyperX Cloud connects through standard 3.5mm jacks, nevertheless, you honestly shouldn’t must tweak it by any means out from the box. It may sound pretty damn great.

The sole downside is the microphone. It’s very flexible, which I appreciate, but has a propensity to pick up background noise and plosives while leaving your voice nasally and hollow.

The slightly-more-expensive HyperX Cloud II is, I believe, more a lateral move than a noticeable difference over its predecessor. It swaps the 3.5mm connection to get a 7.1-ready USB soundcard with better in-line controls and a bit of noise cancellation about the microphone, however you wouldn’t notice a massive distinction between the 2 iterations and I’m unsure the rise in cost is worth it.

Regardless, either model is a superb selection for a gaming headset. In a increasingly crowded market, the HyperX Cloud nails just about every major category with few significant compromises. I hope another model improves about the microphone, but also for $80 it’s a steal.

The Cloud Stinger provides solid sound, serious comfort, along with an attractive design for everyone who just requires a “good enough” headset without having wallet-shock.

HyperX’s Cloud headset continues to be the most popular, nevertheless the company undercut themselves just a little by releasing the HyperX Cloud Stinger. Listed at $50, it’s one of the cheapest gaming headsets I’ve experienced from your reputable brand. And it’s good.

Sure, it’s not quite as effective as the initial Cloud, but for many individuals the Stinger ought to do perfectly. The plastic chassis lacks some of the original Cloud’s panache and durability, but looks high-end from your distance and sits pretty slim in the head. HyperX also solved the Cloud’s biggest issue and ultimately put a volume slider straight at the base in the right earcup and gave it a flip-to-mute microphone, so no longer fiddling with in-line controls.

When it comes to audio, the Cloud Stinger’s got a good mid-range with hardly any distortion even at high volumes. The treble is a bit underpowered as well as the bass range is almost nonexistent, but 80 % of any given game, film, or song can come through clear and clean.

If you already possess a good headset, particularly the original Cloud, I wouldn’t say the Stinger is a must-own. But when you’re looking for the best excellent value on entry-level hardware, this is certainly it. It’s an insane bargain when you compare it with other headsets within the same price tier.

Only under $100, Corsair’s Void Wireless is usually an excellent wireless headset, but you will encounter some compromises.

Frankly speaking, Corsair doesn’t genuinely have any competition in this category. Most decent wireless gaming headsets will run you $150 or more. Corsair’s Void Wireless is priced in a mere $100, which leaves it on its lonesome.

But even comprising that vacuum, it’s excellent. Not phenomenal, mind you, but at the price you’re obtaining a bargain.

I wasn’t really sure what things to make from the Void’s weird, diamond-shaped ear cups but after some use I’m actually pretty pleased. The Void Wireless sits a bit forward in the head, using the band resting just above your forehead. It requires some getting used to, but the end result is less tension in the jaw and much more on the rear of the pinnacle where it’s less noticeable. I wouldn’t say it’s as comfortable as the more conventional HyperX Cloud, but undoubtedly I enjoy it over its predecessor, the H2100.

The on-headset controls are fairly intuitive, with a volume rocker on the bottom of your left ear, plus oversized buttons for power and mute in the side. And it’s got 16.8 million color RGB lighting, if that’s your bag.

The greatest design issue would be that the Void Wireless is heavy. It’s no problem when sitting up, but when you peer down or check out the headset has a tendency to slide around. I don’t know whether it’s as a result of battery or the metal-augmented construction, yet your neck turns into a workout using this headset.

Sound-wise, the Void Wireless still needs some work. It sounds passable, especially while gaming, but throwing on some music sets the Void Wireless’s limitations into stark relief. The low-end is muddy and distorted, and also the whole selection of mid-to-high-end frequencies sounds slick, like you’ve applied a lot of compression.

You may adjust the headset’s sound in Corsair’s software, but Corsair’s software is still a lttle bit unwieldy. Much better than just last year, I think, but nevertheless not on par with Razer, SteelSeries, or Logitech. Also, quite a few users have reported troubles with firmware updates-not just a great sign.

“This doesn’t appear to be a tremendously positive review,” you may say. And you’re right, it’s not. The Void Wireless is not an incredible headset, as I said up top. However it is the ideal wireless gaming headset under $150, and given just how many wires are affixed to my PC at any moment, the benefit of cheap wireless could be worth sacrificing a little bit of sound quality.

Logitech’s G533 doesn’t have quite a similar breadth of options since the G933, but an even more restrained design along with a bargain price make this a solid contender for the best wireless headset.

It’s a tough call replacing our former mid-tier wireless pick, the Logitech G933, with its sibling-successor the Logitech G533. Like, really tough. The G933 is a wonderful headset, with crisp and well-balanced audio and some nifty design features (like having the capability to keep the USB dongle inside an earcup).

But I’m still replacing it. Why? Well, aesthetics certainly are a huge reason. If you need an indication how Logitech’s design language has shifted previously year approximately, your search is over gam1ngheadset the G933 and G533. The G933 was all sharp angles and science fiction. The G533 alternatively is sleek, professional, restrained. By using a piano-black finish and soft curves, it seems just like a headset created by Audio-Technica or Sennheiser or even a more mainstream audio company-possibly not a “gaming” headset. I love it.

The G533’s design is also functional. The microphone isn’t as hidden as I’d like, but that’s the sole flaw. The headset is lightweight, durable, and fewer vise-grip tight than its predecessor.

As for audio fidelity? It’s not quite similar to the G933, nevertheless the differences are minimal. The G533 lacks a little bit of oomph, especially at lower volumes, and its particular 7.1 support is subpar. Those are hardly reasons to stay away, though-the majority of people will run the headset loud enough to counteract the headset’s lack of presence, and virtual 7.1 is (for me) pretty much always bad. The G533 is worse compared to the average, however the average is still something I select to avoid day-to-day.

Whatever the case, the G933 continues to be being offered and it is an absolutely sensible choice for many, particularly if you want console support. The G533 is PC-only, as the G933 can be attached by 3.5mm cable to other devices. Of course, if you value comfort over audio fidelity, check out the SteelSeries Arctis 7 too-another great choice.

Astro’s new A50 touts a whole new charging station and much better controls, but nevertheless doesn’t put out the audio you could possibly expect coming from a $300 kind of headphones.

SteelSeries Siberia 800 Wireless Dolby 7.1 Gaming Headset

Right after a new generation in the computer headphone and Siberia 800 released in 2016, I assumed we might finally break the tie that’s dominated our splurge headset pick in the past few years.

But once again, there’s no clear winner in that $300 price-though Astro certainly made some strides toward edging out SteelSeries.

The new A50’s biggest improvement is definitely the battery. The new model overcomes an extended-running weak spot and packs in 12 to 15 hours of life-enough to help you get through a good long day of gaming. Better still, it features gyroscopes from the ears that give it time to detect whether you’ve set it up down. It automatically shuts off ten seconds later if so, then turns back and connects to your PC on once you pick it back up. Its base station also serves as a charger, a great combination of function and sweetness.